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When Personal Crisis Strikes

 

Turning for help when a personal crisis hits is critical, as it can be the difference between life and death. There are nearly 30,000 suicides in the United States each year, and many of them could have been averted if the person contemplating suicide turned to get help.

I am not saying that, before committing suicide, some of those people didn’t ask for help or cry out in their own way. Perhaps they did try to get help but they weren’t taken seriously or turned to the wrong place. Therefore, knowing where to turn to for help is important when contemplating suicide, coping with grief and depression, or facing another personal crisis.

As a teenager, I felt distressed to the point of death on more than one occasion. Although I never seriously contemplated how I could end my own life, I certainly felt distressed to the point of not wanting to be alive. I am a firm believer that my spiritual condition was the source of my agony. I spent many days in misery blaming others before realizing that I had made some poor choices and I needed to admit to them and ask God for forgiveness.

Those days of misery have passed as my spiritual maturity has blossomed and my faith in Jesus Christ has grown. I have learned that with faith, prayer, and God’s love, humans can endure great hardship with confidence that they will survive. My faith is what I ultimately turned to in my times of greatest crisis and it gave me reason to live. In faith I opened the Bible, which I learned about in Sunday school, and read passages about life. My faith informs me that God is in control of everything, even if I don’t understand.

Committing suicide is sometimes done out of revenge, spite, or cowardice. Rather than face a crisis, forgive someone, or make amends, people take their own lives. It is truly sad and most if not all could be prevented.

There are many places that we can turn to for help before attempting suicide or during a personal crisis.  Besides God and the Bible, family, friends, and even mental health treatment professionals are available to lend a hand. Although other people are usually the primary source of counsel in crisis, they can also be a source of anguish. There are other resources available that can be encouraging and inspiring, such as movies, music, and literature.

There are also activities that we can engage in to promote feelings of well-being, inner peace, and relaxation. Physical exercise is a great method of coping with grief. Taking a long walk, riding a bike, lifting some weights, or engaging in anything else that causes a sweat will help. Try to exercise for at least 45 minutes to feel better, as there is scientific evidence supporting the “feel good” benefits of exercise after 45 minutes. Writing letters, engaging in a hobby, or just talking and letting your emotions and thoughts manifest that way, is often therapeutic. Spending time with a pet or other animal has benefits. Even crying can release pent up feelings and bring relief. I have done all of these things to aid in coping with grief and misery.

When facing crisis, the worst thing to do is not tell anyone and isolate. That may lead to tragic outcomes.

If you need help, call 1-800-781-7840 or 1-800-273-8255. There is so much more to live for.

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Kevin Giles is a product of Santa Cruz, CA – the stoner capitol of the world. A born again Christian, Kevin loves his Lord Jesus and believes that his purpose in life is determined by God. He first entered drug recovery at the age of 19, suffering from an addiction to marijuana. He is a recent graduate of the Assemblies of God Theological Seminary, where he earned his Master’s degree in Christian Ministry. Passionate about God’s Word, he aspires to become a pastor or missionary. Kevin has also earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology from California State University, Monterey Bay. His interests include traveling, movies, golf, fitness and reading. He also enjoys being outdoors as well as spending time with friends and family. Kevin’s faith, education and life experience give him a unique perspective on addiction, recovery and spirituality.

Filed under: Conditions and Disorders, Life, Mental Illness, Recovery · Tags: crisis, death, depression, God, grief, hope, inner peace, life, mental health, self harm, suicide, suicide prevention, well-being