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Lance Armstrong’s Dragging Doping Controversy

Lance Armstrong

By de:Benutzer:Hase (Self-photographed)

Last week, while Roger Clemens was acquitted of all perjury charges concerning his testimony on the use of performance enhancing drugs, another such unfortunate athlete, Lance Armstrong, is being held accountable for using drugs, possibly being stripped of all his titles.

Lance Armstrong, one of the world’s greatest and most influential athletes, started his cycling career at the age of sixteen, never looking back.  In 1991 he won the U.S National Amateur Championship, sparking his career as a professional cyclist.  Soon after he ranked No. 1 in the world, racing for the U.S Olympic Team, he developed testicular cancer that spread to his lungs and brain, dropping him out of racing.  However, with chemotherapy and the determination to live and return to cycling, he made a miraculous recovery, cycling once more.  He went on to win six Tour de France titles, and started numerous foundations for cancer patients, worldwide.  The yellow ARMSTRONG bracelets, which people are still seen wearing today, promote the Lance Armstrong Foundation.

For years, Armstrong has been the main focus of accusations that he used performance enhancing drugs throughout his career since the mid 90’s to the mid 2000’s.  Accusations stemming from fellow cyclists, as well as others involved in the industry, have put stress on Armstrong’s strong denial that he never used such drugs.

Most recently, SCA Promotions, an insurance company who presented a five million dollar bonus to Armstrong for the 2004 Tour de France, had their lawyer, Jeffrey Tillotsen, send a letter to Lance stating that they were taking back the promotion if he was stripped of his 2004 title.  Armstrong, as in previous years, denied all accusations, stating, “I’m 100 percent right, and you’re 100 percent wrong.”  Armstrong’s lawyer, Tim Herman sent a letter back stating that SCA has no right to take the monies given and has no case due to the fact that, “under Texas law, there is no going back on a voluntary settlement.”

Armstrong is dealing with a much weightier situation than just having to give back money; the United States Anti-Doping Agency is charging him with pasta abuse of steroids.  The agency is alleging that he and his team were part of a decade-long doping conspiracy starting in the late 1990’s.  His other lawyer, Robert D. Luskin wrote to the agency stating that their charges were “long on stale allegations disproved long ago and short on evidence.”  The agency however has actual expert analysis of blood data dating back from 2009 and 2010, producing evidence of blood manipulation, including EPO and/or blood transfusions.  Along with such evidence, the agency also has over ten fellow cyclists and team personnel that are willing to testify in the case.  If Armstrong is found guilty of doping and charged, he will subsequently lose his Tour de France titles and all of his prize winnings.  The case will probably be held no later than November 2012 according to the agency however in the past; cases such as these have been drawn out for months or even years so we may not hear a verdict for a long time.


Work Cited:

Macur, Juliet. “Armstrong Could Lose More Than Titles if Guilty of Doping.” The New York Times, 22 June 2012. Web. 27 June 2012.


Lance Armstrong. Space Craft. Web. 27 June 2012.


By Matt B.

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Filed under: Celebrity News · Tags: Addiction, Alcohol and Drugs, Armstrong, athletes, athletes on drugs, Austin, cancer, celebrity addiction, cycling, cyclists, Lance Armstrong, performance enhancing drugs, perjury charges, Roger Clemens, SCA Promotions, steroid abuse, steroids, testicular cancer, Texas, Tour de France, U.S National Amateur Championship, U.S Olympic Team, United States Anti-Doping Agency, using drugs

  • Herald

    if they keep going after him, there must be something behind the claims…